Split decision

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RichW
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2017 11:23 pm

Split decision

Post by RichW » Sat Nov 11, 2017 11:40 pm

Has anyone got experience of owning the PHEV version. I’m looking to get one as a company lease so the PHEV looks attractive from a tax point but could live with extra cost of the std car. I have read some reviews saying the extra weight makes it feel lethargic and the ride jittery saying the non plug in handles and rides better. Would welcome advice.


niroal
Posts: 177
Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2017 11:22 am
Location: North Kent

Re: Split decision

Post by niroal » Sun Nov 12, 2017 3:15 pm

We test drove (& bought) a PHEV yesterday & personally I can’t see where those reviews were coming from.
The pick up is far better than the standard one as it has a much more powerful electric motor. I felt the ride was also no worse, but I gave only driven a standard one on 18” rims. It cruised fine at motorway speeds in electric only mode and mixed with the varying speeds brilliantly using the adaptive cruise. If you have a route planned on the sat nav it helps you with coasting advice which is helpful. As the electric motor is much more powerful then petrol engine fires up much less often so it is more refined but I never felt it lethargic.

The main boot is just as deep so the only loss of space is in the under tray so no real loss for big bags.
Niro 3 PHEV Graphite


Fred_Bristol
Posts: 28
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:10 pm

Re: Split decision

Post by Fred_Bristol » Sun Nov 12, 2017 7:11 pm

Interesting! To judge by journalistic comments you would think the PHEV was a pig compared with the HEV.
Thanks for your comments. Helpful. We want to try a 2018 Nissan Leaf before we decide between continuing with full electric or PHEV.
Fred


Old Salt
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2017 6:01 pm

Re: Split decision

Post by Old Salt » Sun Nov 12, 2017 8:16 pm

Similar things were said about the HEV. Steering having no feedback, poor wet tyre grip etc. How anyone doing a review after a 20 minutes drive can say that is ridiculous. Trouble is some people will believe these so called experts.
MY18 Kia Niro 4 - Ocean Blue

мы приходим невидимый - HM Submarines Conqueror, Churchill, Renown, Onslaught, Ocelot, Porpoise


RichW
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2017 11:23 pm

Re: Split decision

Post by RichW » Sun Nov 12, 2017 11:12 pm

Thanks for all your comments I think the PHEV is the way to go.


niroal
Posts: 177
Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2017 11:22 am
Location: North Kent

Re: Split decision

Post by niroal » Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:21 am

Fred_Bristol wrote:
Sun Nov 12, 2017 7:11 pm
Interesting! To judge by journalistic comments you would think the PHEV was a pig compared with the HEV.
Thanks for your comments. Helpful. We want to try a 2018 Nissan Leaf before we decide between continuing with full electric or PHEV.
Fred
Fred

From memory are you also a Zoe owner too? For us, the 2 cars will be fighting for the charger!!
Niro 3 PHEV Graphite


AlanW55
Posts: 99
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2017 4:31 pm

Re: Split decision

Post by AlanW55 » Mon Nov 13, 2017 4:14 pm

The HEV very fastidiously protects its battery, always keeping charge level between 30-80%, presumably to maximise its life? The PHEV's battery is at the mercy of its owner who will regularly charge it to 100%.... good job there's a 7 year warranty.
2017 First Edition HEV in pearlescent white, standard spec.


Fred_Bristol
Posts: 28
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:10 pm

Re: Split decision

Post by Fred_Bristol » Mon Nov 13, 2017 6:37 pm

Hi niroal
We have had the Zoe since 2015 and we like the driving experience, preferring it even to our DSG Yeti which is pretty good in town driving conditions with a responsive automatic gearbox that copes with most situations well.

The Zoe has two shortcomings, range, which we knew about, and false warnings of electrical faults (the dreaded spanner, and "check electrical system" - which of course you can't) and the dealer can't find anything wrong. So the Zoe is going back at the end of its PCP, the GMV of over £7k is ridiculous. That said it was a cheap way of trying out an electric car over an extended period. Despite the ominous warnings it has not let us down so far. Long journeys just take planning and a flexible approach to arrival times.

The PHEV seems like an interesting compromise. Electric for local (well under 30 miles and within 20, 30 and 40 mph limits) and hybrid for loner and faster journeys. A sort of amalgam of Zoe and Yeti.

There will only be one car in the future, so no conflict for the charger.

Fred


Fred_Bristol
Posts: 28
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:10 pm

Re: Split decision

Post by Fred_Bristol » Mon Nov 13, 2017 7:13 pm

Hi AlanW55
Battery degradation due to charging to 100% is negligible if done slowly. Fast charging is a different matter. The Zoe has a cooling fan, but it has only ever come on during a 43 kW charge on a motorway charger. I've never experienced it on either the 7 kW home charger or the 2.3 kW charger from a 13 Amp socket. The Zoe regularly goes to 100% and balances the battery, and the range has not decreased in 2 1/2 years.

If the daily routine consists of emptying the battery (if the PHEV allows that) with hard driving and fast charging (motoring journalist style) then that may be a different matter. Harsh climates are another problem.

I am under the impression that the PHEV engine cuts in under hard acceleration or if the battery gets low even when in EV mode - or at least that is what the we were told during the Hyundai Ioniq PHEV demonstration run.

Any further personal experiences of the PHEV would be welcome.

Fred


niroal
Posts: 177
Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2017 11:22 am
Location: North Kent

Re: Split decision

Post by niroal » Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:23 pm

Fred our Zoe GFV is over £6700 & that is after 3 years so unless there is any deal to be had it is going back next June which is a shame as to us it is a far better car than the CAP values. Our Niro is replacing a diesel Kuga so for 7 months or so we will have 2 plugins so we will see how that goes. I agree the Niro PHEV is a good compromise & hopefully we will save money without the range anxiety the third world charging network we have can cause.
From what I understand with the Niro PHEV the battery gauge looks to be in 2 parts, the big part which allows EV running & then after that there is a small section where the car behaves like the HEV so you can never drain the battery in EV mode. The Niro PHEV has a 60hp motor rather than a 90hp one in the Zoe so yes the ICE will cut in when needed in EV mode. Fast changing Zoe style is not possible on the Niro so 6.6 charging is the limit.
BTW with the Zoe I’ve regularly had the fan kick in during 7kW home charging, although mainly during summer after spirited driving just prior to charging
Niro 3 PHEV Graphite


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